Waitress outfit ideas – how to pick the most suitable shoes

A waitress is an endless job. There is much-unnamed work during the shift. If you are working at a high reputation restaurant or coffee, you probably have no time to rest. You are not supposed to run but I’m sure you will have to walk a lot.

Smiling young waiter with his hands behind backhttp://www.twodozendesign.info/i/1.png

Normally, when you work as a waiter and waitress, you will have their uniform. But you are the one to decide the shoes. The manager can require a color code then you are free to choose any kind of shoe you like.

For a waiter, it is pretty simple. There are not many kinds of shoes for a man to choose from. And most men shoe is comfortable to walk for a long time. In this article, we will focus on how to pick shoes for a waitress.

A smarter way to use the flour sifter

Most probably in the bakery shops, sifting of flours makes a greater different in certain recipes like the pound cakes and the layer cakes. The sifted flour will be got through the help of the fine mesh strainer so you will get the airy texture and light flour. For this purpose, you should need to make use of the flour sifter that removes the pesky pieces from the cocoa powder, sugar or anything to get the fine flour.

Image credits: quick easy cook

Tarragon – properties, use, substitute, to what dishes to add tarragon

Estragon (artemisia dracunculus), also known as the dragoids of draganki, is a plant from the Asteraceae family. Growing tarragon is not too burdensome and complicated. This plant does not require any special care. Tarragon has found many applications – both in the kitchen and pharmacotherapy. Parts of tarragon growing above the ground are used for the production of medicines. What dishes should tarragon be used for? What are its properties?

Tarragon – properties


In medicine, estragon herb , ie above-ground parts of the plant, as well as tarragon oil has been applied . Herb tarragon contains:

  • essential oil
  • flavonoids
  • carotenoids
  • bitter relationship
  • tannins
  • coumarin


It is also rich in potassium – 100 g of the product contains up to 3020 mg of potassium, vitamin A, calcium and magnesium.

Tarragon stimulates the secretion of bile and its flow into the duodenum. It reduces the tension of the smooth muscle of the gastrointestinal tract, as well as bile and urinary tract. It also stimulates digestion by increasing the secretion of gastric juice. You can also look for its antifungal and insecticidal activity.

What is the best tarragon substitute?

What instead of tarragon? You can change it with a different mix of spices depending on what product or dish you intend to season. Sweet or hot peppers give the taste to poultry dishes, soups, seafood or baked potatoes.

Celery perfectly blends in with fish dishes, it is also worth adding to salads and sauces. Nutmeg is suitable for sauces or bechamel sauce. The mixture of thyme and oregano is ideal for poultry, fish, steamed vegetables, pasta, soups and salads and grilled meat. Curry or coriander, like tarragon, works as a substitute for salt for marinades, meats and fish.

Things to consider in getting a can opener

What is a Can Opener?

As the word describes it a can opener is a tin opener. It is a device in the kitchen that is, of course, used to open canned foods. This handy device may be ignored at times but this blog will show you how important it is.

History of Can Opener

The first can opener was invented by Ezra J. Warner, a native of Waterbury on January 5, 1858. The first commercial can opener was invented 50 years after the invention of tins or cans. This was due to the reason that cans were made of huge metals that can only be opened by either a hammer or chisel.

When the lighter gauge was available, thus the invention of a handier can opener. Warner’s design was consisting of a sharp sickle pushed into the tin and then sawed around the tin’s edge. There is a guard that keeps the sickle from penetrating too far. Warner’s invention was first intended for military purposes. read more